Rising Urbanists

SPEAKERS

 

   Ashley Dawson  is the   Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities at the  Princeton Environmental Institute   , on leave from his permanent position as Professor of English at the Graduate Center/CUNY and the College of Staten Island.   He is the author of two recent books on topics relating to the environmental humanities,     Extreme Cities: The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change     (Verso, 2017),   and     Extinction: A Radical History   (O/R, 2016), as well as six previous books on global social justice movements and anti-imperialism.

Ashley Dawson is the Barron Visiting Professor in the Environment and the Humanities at the Princeton Environmental Institute, on leave from his permanent position as Professor of English at the Graduate Center/CUNY and the College of Staten Island. He is the author of two recent books on topics relating to the environmental humanities, Extreme Cities: The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change (Verso, 2017), and Extinction: A Radical History (O/R, 2016), as well as six previous books on global social justice movements and anti-imperialism.

  Catherine Seavitt Nordenson, ASLA, AIA , is an associate professor of landscape architecture at City College of New York and principal of Catherine Seavitt Studio. Her research explores adaptation to climate change in urban environments and the novel transformation of landscape restoration practices. She is also interested in the intersection of political power, environmental activism, and public health, particularly as seen through the design of public space and policy. Her recent books include  Structures of Coastal Resilience  (Island Press, 2018);  Depositions: Roberto Burle Marx and Public Landscapes under Dictatorship  (University of Texas Press, 2018) and  Corridor Workbook: Design Initiative for RPA’s Fourth Regional Plan  (Regional Plan Association, 2017).

Catherine Seavitt Nordenson, ASLA, AIA, is an associate professor of landscape architecture at City College of New York and principal of Catherine Seavitt Studio. Her research explores adaptation to climate change in urban environments and the novel transformation of landscape restoration practices. She is also interested in the intersection of political power, environmental activism, and public health, particularly as seen through the design of public space and policy. Her recent books include Structures of Coastal Resilience (Island Press, 2018); Depositions: Roberto Burle Marx and Public Landscapes under Dictatorship (University of Texas Press, 2018) and Corridor Workbook: Design Initiative for RPA’s Fourth Regional Plan (Regional Plan Association, 2017).

  Thaddeus Pawlowski,  Managing Director for the Center for Resilient Cities and Landscapes, is an urban designer who has been working at the forefront of adapting cities to climate change. Working in New York City government since the early 2000s, he has sought to integrate adaptation and resilience into the long term development patterns of the city through the design of projects, policies and programs. After Hurricane Sandy, he worked with the NYC Mayor’s Office on setting up disaster recovery programs and worked with communities to navigate the complex regulatory programmatic, regulatory and design landscape of recovery and resilience. He has a Masters in Architecture from University of Pennsylvania and was a 2015 Loeb Fellow at Harvard University.

Thaddeus Pawlowski, Managing Director for the Center for Resilient Cities and Landscapes, is an urban designer who has been working at the forefront of adapting cities to climate change. Working in New York City government since the early 2000s, he has sought to integrate adaptation and resilience into the long term development patterns of the city through the design of projects, policies and programs. After Hurricane Sandy, he worked with the NYC Mayor’s Office on setting up disaster recovery programs and worked with communities to navigate the complex regulatory programmatic, regulatory and design landscape of recovery and resilience. He has a Masters in Architecture from University of Pennsylvania and was a 2015 Loeb Fellow at Harvard University.

  Stefanie Loomis  is an Associate at Local Office Landscape and Urban Design—a landscape architecture firm in Brooklyn, NY. Operating between infrastructure, urbanism, and ecology, the firm’s focus is resilient hydrology and energy systems, realized in landscapes of all scales. From bioswales that mitigate inland flooding, to coastal parks that employ sustainable technologies at the scale of urbanism, Local Office seeks to ameliorate the impact of cities on their waterways and coastlines, while also protecting vulnerable communities from atmospheric and man-made disturbances. Stefanie has a Bachelor of Arts in Community, Environment and Planning and Painting and Drawing from the University of Washington and a Master of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning from the University of Pennsylvania. Throughout her career her work has been focused on helping communities set and realize their goals for physical, social and economic resilience. 

Stefanie Loomis is an Associate at Local Office Landscape and Urban Design—a landscape architecture firm in Brooklyn, NY. Operating between infrastructure, urbanism, and ecology, the firm’s focus is resilient hydrology and energy systems, realized in landscapes of all scales. From bioswales that mitigate inland flooding, to coastal parks that employ sustainable technologies at the scale of urbanism, Local Office seeks to ameliorate the impact of cities on their waterways and coastlines, while also protecting vulnerable communities from atmospheric and man-made disturbances. Stefanie has a Bachelor of Arts in Community, Environment and Planning and Painting and Drawing from the University of Washington and a Master of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning from the University of Pennsylvania. Throughout her career her work has been focused on helping communities set and realize their goals for physical, social and economic resilience. 

  Christina M. K. Kaunzinger  is an ecologist in the Department of Landscape Architecture, Rutgers University.  Her interests include the relationship between coastal resilience and coastal habitats, enhancing biodiversity and ecosystem function through landscape architecture, and building interdisciplinary collaborations through “Campus as Lab”, sustainability and research initiatives.  She served on the BIG Rebuild by Design Team, the Waterfront Edge Design Guidelines (WEDG) Technical Advisory Committee for the Waterfront Alliance, and is currently working with the Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay on an NYSDOS/NYSERDA effort to develop a monitoring framework for natural and nature-based shoreline protection features. She holds a BA in Biology from Drew University and a PhD in Ecology & Evolution from Rutgers University.

Christina M. K. Kaunzinger is an ecologist in the Department of Landscape Architecture, Rutgers University.  Her interests include the relationship between coastal resilience and coastal habitats, enhancing biodiversity and ecosystem function through landscape architecture, and building interdisciplinary collaborations through “Campus as Lab”, sustainability and research initiatives.  She served on the BIG Rebuild by Design Team, the Waterfront Edge Design Guidelines (WEDG) Technical Advisory Committee for the Waterfront Alliance, and is currently working with the Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay on an NYSDOS/NYSERDA effort to develop a monitoring framework for natural and nature-based shoreline protection features. She holds a BA in Biology from Drew University and a PhD in Ecology & Evolution from Rutgers University.

  Michael Tantala, P.E., ASLA Affiliate,  is a professional engineer and Principal with Tantala Associates, LLC, Engineers & Architects in Philadelphia and an Adjunct Professor at the Spitzer School of Architecture of the City College of New York.  Michael is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and Princeton University and a co-recipient of the AIA Latrobe Prize.  He collaborated on the “Structures of Coastal Resilience” Project funded by the Rockefeller Foundation with the United States Army Corps of Engineers to develop resilient and adaptive coastal design strategies addressing climate change.  Michael’s research includes GIS/geospatial modeling of urban infrastructure systems and their interactions. 

Michael Tantala, P.E., ASLA Affiliate, is a professional engineer and Principal with Tantala Associates, LLC, Engineers & Architects in Philadelphia and an Adjunct Professor at the Spitzer School of Architecture of the City College of New York.  Michael is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and Princeton University and a co-recipient of the AIA Latrobe Prize.  He collaborated on the “Structures of Coastal Resilience” Project funded by the Rockefeller Foundation with the United States Army Corps of Engineers to develop resilient and adaptive coastal design strategies addressing climate change.  Michael’s research includes GIS/geospatial modeling of urban infrastructure systems and their interactions. 

  Jean You  recently joined NYC Department of City Planning (DCP) and is working on the Flood Resilience Zoning Update to support future resiliency in the City’s flood-prone areas.  Since her first encounter with communities in Haiti right after the earthquake in 2010, Jean has committed her academic studies and professional work to public service and resiliency planning and design, locally and internationally. Prior to DCP, Jean worked in the strategic initiatives division at NYC Department of Design and Construction where she managed interagency resiliency projects. She contributed to the  Design and Construction Excellence 2.0 Guiding Principles  and developed guidelines to help refine the design and construction of resilient public buildings and infrastructure. She was also involved in NYC Build It Back as a consultant. Jean’s interest in design and policy especially stems from her graduate studio course and publication  Design and Politics: Managing Risks and Vulnerabilities , modeled after Rebuild By Design and led by Henk Ovink and Sam Carter. 

Jean You recently joined NYC Department of City Planning (DCP) and is working on the Flood Resilience Zoning Update to support future resiliency in the City’s flood-prone areas.  Since her first encounter with communities in Haiti right after the earthquake in 2010, Jean has committed her academic studies and professional work to public service and resiliency planning and design, locally and internationally. Prior to DCP, Jean worked in the strategic initiatives division at NYC Department of Design and Construction where she managed interagency resiliency projects. She contributed to the Design and Construction Excellence 2.0 Guiding Principles and developed guidelines to help refine the design and construction of resilient public buildings and infrastructure. She was also involved in NYC Build It Back as a consultant. Jean’s interest in design and policy especially stems from her graduate studio course and publication Design and Politics: Managing Risks and Vulnerabilities, modeled after Rebuild By Design and led by Henk Ovink and Sam Carter. 

  Manuela Powidayko  is an urban designer at the NYC Department of City Planning and project manager for the  Flood Resilience Zoning Update . Her research explores how zoning regulations can help encourage long-term flood resistant building design, while promoting vibrant coastal communities. She is also interested in engaging with coastal communities on these issues, and was an active member in an extensive community outreach effort throughout 2016-18, in which she was the author of the  Planning a Resilient NYC  poster illustration, produced workshop materials to facilitate the conversation with communities, and helped on creating a  short video  that explains City Planning's ongoing resiliency efforts. She also contributed with the  NYC Resilient Neighborhoods Reports  (NYC Department of City Planning, 2017),  Water Infrastructure ,   (Urban Design Lab-Columbia University, 2016) and  Manyatta: A guide to do-it-yourself infrastructure  (Urban Design Lab-Columbia University, 2016).

Manuela Powidayko is an urban designer at the NYC Department of City Planning and project manager for the Flood Resilience Zoning Update. Her research explores how zoning regulations can help encourage long-term flood resistant building design, while promoting vibrant coastal communities. She is also interested in engaging with coastal communities on these issues, and was an active member in an extensive community outreach effort throughout 2016-18, in which she was the author of the Planning a Resilient NYC poster illustration, produced workshop materials to facilitate the conversation with communities, and helped on creating a short video that explains City Planning's ongoing resiliency efforts. She also contributed with the NYC Resilient Neighborhoods Reports (NYC Department of City Planning, 2017), Water Infrastructure, (Urban Design Lab-Columbia University, 2016) and Manyatta: A guide to do-it-yourself infrastructure (Urban Design Lab-Columbia University, 2016).

  Elizabeth Jordan  is an Ecological Project Manager for the Natural Resources Group within NYC Parks and Recreation. She has over 15 years experience managing landscape, shoreline and restoration projects in California, Washington, and New York. Before coming to the City of New York Park Department, Elizabeth was the Capital Program Manager for Vancouver-Clark Parks and Recreation in Washington State, where she managed the bond-funded park development program and oversaw the design development of the Columbia River shoreline for the City of Vancouver, Washington. Prior to moving to Washington, Elizabeth was a Landscape Architect for the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, which manages over 55,000 acres within Los Angeles. She was actively involved with the Southern California ASLA chapter, serving as Secretary and Program Coordinator. Elizabeth graduated in 2003 from the University of California Los Angeles Extension Landscape Architecture program. She has been a licensed Landscape Architect since 2005 and is currently licensed in New York and Washington.

Elizabeth Jordan is an Ecological Project Manager for the Natural Resources Group within NYC Parks and Recreation. She has over 15 years experience managing landscape, shoreline and restoration projects in California, Washington, and New York. Before coming to the City of New York Park Department, Elizabeth was the Capital Program Manager for Vancouver-Clark Parks and Recreation in Washington State, where she managed the bond-funded park development program and oversaw the design development of the Columbia River shoreline for the City of Vancouver, Washington. Prior to moving to Washington, Elizabeth was a Landscape Architect for the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, which manages over 55,000 acres within Los Angeles. She was actively involved with the Southern California ASLA chapter, serving as Secretary and Program Coordinator.
Elizabeth graduated in 2003 from the University of California Los Angeles Extension Landscape Architecture program. She has been a licensed Landscape Architect since 2005 and is currently licensed
in New York and Washington.

  Brad McKee  began working as the editor of Landscape Architecture Magazine in the spring of 2010, just before the magazine’s 100th anniversary. To mark that occasion, he led a total redesign and reprogramming of the magazine to focus on the most forward-looking work in a profession increasingly called on to lead the creation of public spaces, tackle the problems of climate change, and confront the effects of natural disasters and environmental hazards.  Brad started his design publishing career at the magazine Architecture in the early 1990s. He also worked as the arts editor of Washington City Paper for several years and as a contract reporter for the New York Times from 2000 to 2006—and during that time, also worked in a Maryland nursery.

Brad McKee began working as the editor of Landscape Architecture Magazine in the spring of 2010, just before the magazine’s 100th anniversary. To mark that occasion, he led a total redesign and reprogramming of the magazine to focus on the most forward-looking work in a profession increasingly called on to lead the creation of public spaces, tackle the problems of climate change, and confront the effects of natural disasters and environmental hazards.

Brad started his design publishing career at the magazine Architecture in the early 1990s. He also worked as the arts editor of Washington City Paper for several years and as a contract reporter for the New York Times from 2000 to 2006—and during that time, also worked in a Maryland nursery.

  Dr. Marcha Johnson, ASLA  is a landscape architect with NYC Parks & Recreation, specializing in ecological restoration and the design of post-industrial urban waterfront parks. She has been an adjunct professor at City College of NY for the past 22 years, teaching regional ecology, plant identification, planting design and sustainable soil and water in the School of Architecture. Her career focus is the design of post-industrial waterfronts which are integrated with their ecological context. Marcha’s current collaborative work at Randall’s Island explores the opportunity to disassemble a collapsing stone sea wall, creating a habitat-rich shoreline which accommodates changing water levels . Recent award-winning work at Harlem R. Park resulted in a prototypical porous seawall, blending ecology, community involvement, access and environmental education.     Dr. Johnson recently co-edited  Coastal Change, Ocean Conservation and Resilient Communities , a collection of essays and design case studies that explores a range of ideas and best practices for adapting to dynamic waterfront conditions while incorporating nature conservation in urbanized coastal areas.

Dr. Marcha Johnson, ASLA is a landscape architect with NYC Parks & Recreation, specializing in ecological restoration and the design of post-industrial urban waterfront parks. She has been an adjunct professor at City College of NY for the past 22 years, teaching regional ecology, plant identification, planting design and sustainable soil and water in the School of Architecture. Her career focus is the design of post-industrial waterfronts which are integrated with their ecological context. Marcha’s current collaborative work at Randall’s Island explores the opportunity to disassemble a collapsing stone sea wall, creating a habitat-rich shoreline which accommodates changing water levels . Recent award-winning work at Harlem R. Park resulted in a prototypical porous seawall, blending ecology, community involvement, access and environmental education. 
   Dr. Johnson recently co-edited Coastal Change, Ocean Conservation and Resilient Communities, a collection of essays and design case studies that explores a range of ideas and best practices for adapting to dynamic waterfront conditions while incorporating nature conservation in urbanized coastal areas.

  Joshua F. Cerra  is an Associate Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies at Cornell University's Landscape Architecture Program in Ithaca, New York. Cerra's academic and professional work addresses relationships between urban ecosystems, communities and site development processes, and their implications for urban ecological design and climate-adaptive design. Cerra directs the Climate-Adaptive Design Studio (CAD), which in partnership with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and others links design students with flood-prone Hudson riverfront municipalities to explore alternative design strategies for more climate-adapted and connected waterfront areas. Ultimately, the CAD program seeks to inspire awareness and capacity for more climate-resilient waterfronts and their communities. Cerra is the recipient of the CALS Young Faculty Teaching Excellence Award in 2014, the CELA Excellence in Design Studio Teaching Award in 2015 and the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future Faculty Fellowship for Social Sciences, Humanities and the Arts in 2018.

Joshua F. Cerra is an Associate Professor and the Director of Graduate Studies at Cornell University's Landscape Architecture Program in Ithaca, New York. Cerra's academic and professional work addresses relationships between urban ecosystems, communities and site development processes, and their implications for urban ecological design and climate-adaptive design. Cerra directs the Climate-Adaptive Design Studio (CAD), which in partnership with New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and others links design students with flood-prone Hudson riverfront municipalities to explore alternative design strategies for more climate-adapted and connected waterfront areas. Ultimately, the CAD program seeks to inspire awareness and capacity for more climate-resilient waterfronts and their communities. Cerra is the recipient of the CALS Young Faculty Teaching Excellence Award in 2014, the CELA Excellence in Design Studio Teaching Award in 2015 and the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future Faculty Fellowship for Social Sciences, Humanities and the Arts in 2018.

  Andrew Lavallee, FASLA, RLA,  has 30 years of experience designing and management of technically challenging, multidisciplinary projects.  His practice currently focuses on technical consulting, cost planning, and O+M  strategies for public realm projects throughout the United Sates. Andrew is the co-author of the High Performance Landscape Guidelines: Parks for the 21st Century and numerous articles on technical subjects ranging from construction detailing to the development of economically sustainable parks. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Landscape Architecture Graduate Program at City College of New York

Andrew Lavallee, FASLA, RLA, has 30 years of experience designing and management of technically challenging, multidisciplinary projects.  His practice currently focuses on technical consulting, cost planning, and O+M  strategies for public realm projects throughout the United Sates. Andrew is the co-author of the High Performance Landscape Guidelines: Parks for the 21st Century and numerous articles on technical subjects ranging from construction detailing to the development of economically sustainable parks. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Landscape Architecture Graduate Program at City College of New York

  Craig Desmond  is a Craftsman with a background in environmental sustainability and a focus on community building in NYC. Carpenter, Ecotone Building

Craig Desmond is a Craftsman with a background in environmental sustainability and a focus on community building in NYC. Carpenter, Ecotone Building

  Rebekah Breitzer  is a first Year Earth and Environmental Sciences PhD candidate at CUNY Graduate Center with a specialty in Human Geography. CUNY Graduate Center Five Year Fellow. Current research interests include post-industrial American cities, environmental racism, gentrification, revitalization efforts, as well as confronting issues of identity (race, class, gender, etc.) within the built urban landscape. Secondary interests include work in the digital humanities as well as production of knowledge and methodologies in geography.

Rebekah Breitzer is a first Year Earth and Environmental Sciences PhD candidate at CUNY Graduate Center with a specialty in Human Geography. CUNY Graduate Center Five Year Fellow. Current research interests include post-industrial American cities, environmental racism, gentrification, revitalization efforts, as well as confronting issues of identity (race, class, gender, etc.) within the built urban landscape. Secondary interests include work in the digital humanities as well as production of knowledge and methodologies in geography.

  Collin Lee  is a climate justice organizer at UPROSE. He was born and raised in Richmond, Virginia. He earned his BS in Urban and Regional Studies and Planning from Virginia Commonwealth University. Currently, he is pursuing his master’s degree in City and Regional Planning at Pratt Institute. He worked in finance for Capital One for seven years and also with Capital One he has volunteered with special needs children and animal shelters before moving to New York City. When he has time away from school work, he likes to spend time with his dog, a beagle named Daphne.

Collin Lee is a climate justice organizer at UPROSE. He was born and raised in Richmond, Virginia. He earned his BS in Urban and Regional Studies and Planning from Virginia Commonwealth University. Currently, he is pursuing his master’s degree in City and Regional Planning at Pratt Institute. He worked in finance for Capital One for seven years and also with Capital One he has volunteered with special needs children and animal shelters before moving to New York City. When he has time away from school work, he likes to spend time with his dog, a beagle named Daphne.

  Ting Ting Fu  was born in the Fujian Province of China and raised in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. Since the age of 13, Ting Ting has been active with UPROSE. She started as a summer intern and transitioned to being a Youth Organizer. Throughout the years, she has reached out to Sunset Park community on current campaigns that UPROSE has been involved in. She went away to college studying Social Science and moved back to New York to be with her family again. Recently, she was part of a research group reaching out to the community members who maybe have been involved in the clean up activities, as a result of Super Storm Sandy. In 2015, Ting Ting joined UPROSE as a Climate Justice Organizer offering climate adaptation and resilience education to the community as a part of the work for the Climate Justice Center in UPROSE. She has also has been supporting the youth with the Real Roots campaign, an organic and natural self-care products campaign. She has facilitates youth teach-ins, and community events educating the community on Climate Justice, Environmental Justice and UPROSE's Anti Displacement Work.

Ting Ting Fu was born in the Fujian Province of China and raised in Sunset Park, Brooklyn. Since the age of 13, Ting Ting has been active with UPROSE. She started as a summer intern and transitioned to being a Youth Organizer. Throughout the years, she has reached out to Sunset Park community on current campaigns that UPROSE has been involved in. She went away to college studying Social Science and moved back to New York to be with her family again. Recently, she was part of a research group reaching out to the community members who maybe have been involved in the clean up activities, as a result of Super Storm Sandy. In 2015, Ting Ting joined UPROSE as a Climate Justice Organizer offering climate adaptation and resilience education to the community as a part of the work for the Climate Justice Center in UPROSE. She has also has been supporting the youth with the Real Roots campaign, an organic and natural self-care products campaign. She has facilitates youth teach-ins, and community events educating the community on Climate Justice, Environmental Justice and UPROSE's Anti Displacement Work.

  Amy Motzny  is the Watershed Manager for the Gowanus Canal Conservancy, a Brooklyn-based community organization dedicated to facilitating the development of a resilient, vibrant, open space network centered on the Gowanus Canal. She holds a Master of Landscape Architecture from the University of Michigan as well as a B.S. in Environmental Science and Spatial Information Processing. With more than 10 years of experience working in water resource management, she has held positions in both the private and public sectors. As a research scientist and teaching fellow with Columbia University’s Earth Institute, she has conducted extensive research on urban green infrastructure planning and design strategies that provide ecosystem services and socio-cultural benefits to communities.

Amy Motzny is the Watershed Manager for the Gowanus Canal Conservancy, a Brooklyn-based community organization dedicated to facilitating the development of a resilient, vibrant, open space network centered on the Gowanus Canal. She holds a Master of Landscape Architecture from the University of Michigan as well as a B.S. in Environmental Science and Spatial Information Processing. With more than 10 years of experience working in water resource management, she has held positions in both the private and public sectors. As a research scientist and teaching fellow with Columbia University’s Earth Institute, she has conducted extensive research on urban green infrastructure planning and design strategies that provide ecosystem services and socio-cultural benefits to communities.

  Kjirsten Alexander  received her MLA from the City College of New York and holds a Bachelor of Science in Human Development from Cornell's College of Human Ecology. Her work has focused on landscapes of resource extraction, climate change adaptation at coastal environments, and equitable access to high quality open space. Kjirsten is currently working with the wetland restoration team for the Forestry, Horticulture and Natural Resources division of NYC Parks.

Kjirsten Alexander received her MLA from the City College of New York and holds a Bachelor of Science in Human Development from Cornell's College of Human Ecology. Her work has focused on landscapes of resource extraction, climate change adaptation at coastal environments, and equitable access to high quality open space. Kjirsten is currently working with the wetland restoration team for the Forestry, Horticulture and Natural Resources division of NYC Parks.

Design Lab

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Exhibition

Exhibition of works that speak to environmental justice, resiliency, water management, toxicity and other related green infrastructure topics. 

Undercurrent

  Curated by Babbie Dunnington and Sarah Dorner,  Undercurrents is an exhibition of community art and landscape architecture student projects, whose work speaks to environmental justice, resiliency, water management, toxicity and other related green infrastructure topics. Works include videos, screen printed posters, sculpture, models, booklets and presentation boards.   Including Work by: Colby Cannon Welsh, Craig Shaw, Diedre Brown, Essye Klempner, Jon Duff, Marie Lorenz, Tammy Wofsey, Thompson Harris, Blake Enos, Hong Gao, Robynne Heymans, Patchariya Kate Jirasiritham, Babbie Dunnington, Jacqui LeBoutillier, Kari Spiegelhalter, Tess Ruswick, and Patricia Noto   Image Credit: Tammy Wofsey House Under Water 

Curated by Babbie Dunnington and Sarah Dorner, Undercurrents is an exhibition of community art and landscape architecture student projects, whose work speaks to environmental justice, resiliency, water management, toxicity and other related green infrastructure topics. Works include videos, screen printed posters, sculpture, models, booklets and presentation boards. 

Including Work by:
Colby Cannon Welsh, Craig Shaw, Diedre Brown, Essye Klempner, Jon Duff, Marie Lorenz, Tammy Wofsey, Thompson Harris, Blake Enos, Hong Gao, Robynne Heymans, Patchariya Kate Jirasiritham, Babbie Dunnington, Jacqui LeBoutillier, Kari Spiegelhalter, Tess Ruswick, and Patricia Noto 

Image Credit: Tammy Wofsey House Under Water 

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Tech Fair

Exhibition of student designed and executed technologies, which seek to support iterative and collaborative coastal resiliency design and planning processes, featuring:

  • AR Landscape experience - Built by CCNY student + faculty
  • Collaborative coastal resiliency mapping centered around a light table 

Cooperative Mapping

  Developed by Robynne Heymans and Hana Georg, and built by Joe Schleg , this is a hands-on, interactive session centered around a traditional, low-tech design tool- the light table. A base map, GIS-developed featuring flooding, storm-surge, social and economic vulnerability layers, will be at the center of the table and participates will be given the opportunity to imagine design solutions on transparency paper to stack and layer. The result is a multidisciplinary, cooperative effort to redefine resiliency to consistently include environmental justice communities. We imagine this as a rolling session- available in one area throughout the conference so participants can contribute and they’re inspired by the other sessions. We hope to continue to use this tool as a means for interdisciplinary planning efforts. The strength of this tool is in its user's varied expertise and judgement. Participants will have the unique opportunity to work side by side with professionals from varied fields to find meaningful solutions and provoke insightful discussions around uplifting environmental justice communities in our coastal resiliency planning efforts. This exercise will also be featured at the 2018 Waterfront Alliance Conference. 

Developed by Robynne Heymans and Hana Georg, and built by Joe Schleg, this is a hands-on, interactive session centered around a traditional, low-tech design tool- the light table. A base map, GIS-developed featuring flooding, storm-surge, social and economic vulnerability layers, will be at the center of the table and participates will be given the opportunity to imagine design solutions on transparency paper to stack and layer. The result is a multidisciplinary, cooperative effort to redefine resiliency to consistently include environmental justice communities. We imagine this as a rolling session- available in one area throughout the conference so participants can contribute and they’re inspired by the other sessions. We hope to continue to use this tool as a means for interdisciplinary planning efforts. The strength of this tool is in its user's varied expertise and judgement. Participants will have the unique opportunity to work side by side with professionals from varied fields to find meaningful solutions and provoke insightful discussions around uplifting environmental justice communities in our coastal resiliency planning efforts. This exercise will also be featured at the 2018 Waterfront Alliance Conference. 

SITE TOURS

Community lead site tours of environmental justice coastal neighborhoods to connect designers and planners with communities.

SUNSET COVE APRIL 13, 11:00AM

Led by Elizabeth Jordan of NYC Parks Natural Resources Division

 Sunset Cove Park is a 12-acre parcel located on a former abandoned and derelict marina in Broad Channel, Queens, NY, the only populated community within the Jamaica Bay islands. The park is bounded by West 19th Road to the north, Cross Bay Boulevard to the east, and the American Ball Fields to the south. The shoreline of the project area, and Big Egg Marsh to the southeast, are both part of the National Park Service (NPS) Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge and the Gateway National Recreation Area. Formerly known as Schmitt’s Marina, the site was acquired by the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation (NYC Parks) in 2009, at the urging of the community, following prosecution of the owner for environmental and other violations. The area consists largely of construction fill, debris, and invasive vegetation with limited coastal protection and ecological function. The project will include the restoration of up to five acres of salt marsh, enhancement of over seven acres of maritime scrubland and forest, and improvement of the upland perimeter to maximize coastal protection.

Sunset Cove Park is a 12-acre parcel located on a former abandoned and derelict marina in Broad Channel, Queens, NY, the only populated community within the Jamaica Bay islands. The park is bounded by West 19th Road to the north, Cross Bay Boulevard to the east, and the American Ball Fields to the south. The shoreline of the project area, and Big Egg Marsh to the southeast, are both part of the National Park Service (NPS) Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge and the Gateway National Recreation Area. Formerly known as Schmitt’s Marina, the site was acquired by the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation (NYC Parks) in 2009, at the urging of the community, following prosecution of the owner for environmental and other violations. The area consists largely of construction fill, debris, and invasive vegetation with limited coastal protection and ecological function. The project will include the restoration of up to five acres of salt marsh, enhancement of over seven acres of maritime scrubland and forest, and improvement of the upland perimeter to maximize coastal protection.

CANCELLED: Sunset Cove Site tour Registration (free)

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Rescheduled: GOWANUS CANAL Thursday, June 7th, 6:30-8:30 pm
Salt lot
2 2nd AVe | Brooklyn NY 11215

Led by Amy Motzny of the Gowanus Canal Conservancy

 In partnership with ASLA-NY, landscape architects, architects, urban planners, designers, and engineers will participate in a tour of the Gowanus Lowlands vision. With a focus on edge design and green infrastructure, participants will be guided through the Lowlands planning process and exposed to the many challenges and opportunities facing a changing neighborhood in the context of climate change, infrastructure investments, re-zoning, and the Superfund clean-up. 

In partnership with ASLA-NY, landscape architects, architects, urban planners, designers, and engineers will participate in a tour of the Gowanus Lowlands vision. With a focus on edge design and green infrastructure, participants will be guided through the Lowlands planning process and exposed to the many challenges and opportunities facing a changing neighborhood in the context of climate change, infrastructure investments, re-zoning, and the Superfund clean-up. 

gowanus canal site tour registration! (free)

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To host a site tour of your coastal community:

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Site Tour Submissions

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Past Programming

2017 Rising Urbanists: Green Infrastructure for the 22nd Century

Organized by the ASLA-NY Student Chapter at the City College of New York this multi-disciplinary conference offered an opportunity to imagine the potential for green infrastructure to act as a catalyst in driving urban design into the 22nd century. The Rising Urbanists Conference was geared toward students and professionals in architecture, landscape architecture, engineering, urban design, urban planning, real estate, and sustainability throughout the tri-state area. We are hosted this event to foster lasting relationships between emerging professionals in allied fields. It featured two interdisciplinary moderated panels and a very successful design charrette lead by the Gowanus Canal Conservancy.