Rising Urbanists

SPEAKERS

 

Kristina Hill  is an associate professor at the University of California, Berkeley. Hill specializes in the application of ecological and geomorphological knowledge to understanding options for urban adaptation to sea level rise and flooding. She has worked on major adaptation plans for New Orleans, the mid-Atlantic coast, and Seattle. In Seattle, Hill also had the experience of developing and leading a public transit agency, giving her insights into how public agencies manage change. Her current work is on identifying adaptation opportunities in the San Francisco Bay Area, with a focus on biodiversity, infrastructure strategies, new urban district prototypes, and social justice. Hill was a co-author and editor of the book  Ecology and Design , published by Island Press, and was guest editor for the 100th anniversary issue of  Frontiers in Ecology and Environment , published by the Ecological Society of America in 2015. She lectures internationally on urban infrastructure and adaptation. Hill received her PhD and MLA from Harvard University. She has taught at MIT, the University of Washington and the University of Virginia. Hill is now an associate professor at UC Berkeley, working on a book about strategies for urban adaptation to sea level rise.

Kristina Hill is an associate professor at the University of California, Berkeley. Hill specializes in the application of ecological and geomorphological knowledge to understanding options for urban adaptation to sea level rise and flooding. She has worked on major adaptation plans for New Orleans, the mid-Atlantic coast, and Seattle. In Seattle, Hill also had the experience of developing and leading a public transit agency, giving her insights into how public agencies manage change. Her current work is on identifying adaptation opportunities in the San Francisco Bay Area, with a focus on biodiversity, infrastructure strategies, new urban district prototypes, and social justice. Hill was a co-author and editor of the book Ecology and Design, published by Island Press, and was guest editor for the 100th anniversary issue of Frontiers in Ecology and Environment, published by the Ecological Society of America in 2015. She lectures internationally on urban infrastructure and adaptation. Hill received her PhD and MLA from Harvard University. She has taught at MIT, the University of Washington and the University of Virginia. Hill is now an associate professor at UC Berkeley, working on a book about strategies for urban adaptation to sea level rise.

Catherine Seavitt Nordenson, ASLA, AIA , is an associate professor of landscape architecture at City College of New York and principal of Catherine Seavitt Studio. Her research explores adaptation to climate change in urban environments and the novel transformation of landscape restoration practices. She is also interested in the intersection of political power, environmental activism, and public health, particularly as seen through the design of public space and policy. Her recent books include  Structures of Coastal Resilience  (Island Press, 2018);  Depositions: Roberto Burle Marx and Public Landscapes under Dictatorship  (University of Texas Press, 2018) and  Corridor Workbook: Design Initiative for RPA’s Fourth Regional Plan  (Regional Plan Association, 2017).

Catherine Seavitt Nordenson, ASLA, AIA, is an associate professor of landscape architecture at City College of New York and principal of Catherine Seavitt Studio. Her research explores adaptation to climate change in urban environments and the novel transformation of landscape restoration practices. She is also interested in the intersection of political power, environmental activism, and public health, particularly as seen through the design of public space and policy. Her recent books include Structures of Coastal Resilience (Island Press, 2018); Depositions: Roberto Burle Marx and Public Landscapes under Dictatorship (University of Texas Press, 2018) and Corridor Workbook: Design Initiative for RPA’s Fourth Regional Plan (Regional Plan Association, 2017).

Sonja Dümpelmann  is a landscape historian and Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. Her work focuses on nineteenth- and twentieth-century urban landscape history in the Western world and the intersections of landscape, science, technology, and the environment. She is the author and (co-)editor of numerous books, most recently  Seeing Trees: A History of Street Trees in New York City and Berlin  (Yale University Press, 2019). She has served as President of the Landscape History Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians and serves as Senior Fellow in Garden and Landscape Studies at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington DC. She lectures internationally and was appointed 2015 August-Wilhelm Scheer Visiting Professor at the Technical University Munich.

Sonja Dümpelmann is a landscape historian and Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. Her work focuses on nineteenth- and twentieth-century urban landscape history in the Western world and the intersections of landscape, science, technology, and the environment. She is the author and (co-)editor of numerous books, most recently Seeing Trees: A History of Street Trees in New York City and Berlin (Yale University Press, 2019). She has served as President of the Landscape History Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians and serves as Senior Fellow in Garden and Landscape Studies at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Washington DC. She lectures internationally and was appointed 2015 August-Wilhelm Scheer Visiting Professor at the Technical University Munich.

Navé Strauss  is a lifelong tree believer. Growing up the son of an arborist, he had no choice but to learn the ins and outs of horticulture. As his passion grew, he found himself gravitating towards working in an urban forestry setting. With NYC as that setting, Navé currently serves as the Director of Street Tree Planting for the City’s Parks Department. He oversees staff in all 5 boroughs who plant trees on the rights of way and in parklands, employing the current best practices. He is a firm believer that arborists and designers have common goals and should be learning from each other. When not working, he can be found spending time with family friends, reading, cooking, and playing guitar. He holds a Bachelors in Environmental Studies from St. Lawrence University.

Navé Strauss is a lifelong tree believer. Growing up the son of an arborist, he had no choice but to learn the ins and outs of horticulture. As his passion grew, he found himself gravitating towards working in an urban forestry setting. With NYC as that setting, Navé currently serves as the Director of Street Tree Planting for the City’s Parks Department. He oversees staff in all 5 boroughs who plant trees on the rights of way and in parklands, employing the current best practices. He is a firm believer that arborists and designers have common goals and should be learning from each other. When not working, he can be found spending time with family friends, reading, cooking, and playing guitar. He holds a Bachelors in Environmental Studies from St. Lawrence University.

Gordon Brent Brochu-Ingram  is an environmental planner and landscape ecologist focused on public space and lands who, these days, often works in teams making public environmental art. Growing up on Vancouver Island in a Salish-majority community and in a Métis family (one of the the largest indigenous groups in northern North America), much of his activism and scholarship over the last four decades has focused on First Nations governments regaining stewardship of protected areas and other traditional territories. With his intellectual perspectives forged in the University of California Berkeley's College of Environmental Design, where he received his doctorate from the Department of Landscape Architecture, he began research on conflicts around public sex in urban parks in the 1980s and in 1997 co-edited one of the first surveys of LGBT activism in public space, Queers in Space: Communities | Public Space | Sites of Resistance - an anthology that won a Lambda literary award. More recently, he has been exploring a broader concept of 'queer infrastructure' that combines critical understandings of space with those of formation of LGBT organizations and metropolitan political economies. After teaching in North America and Europe, most recently as an Associate Dean at George Mason University in northern Virginia, Brent is based at KEXMIN field station, a research group back where he grew up on the drier islands between Vancouver, Seattle, and Victoria.

Gordon Brent Brochu-Ingram is an environmental planner and landscape ecologist focused on public space and lands who, these days, often works in teams making public environmental art. Growing up on Vancouver Island in a Salish-majority community and in a Métis family (one of the the largest indigenous groups in northern North America), much of his activism and scholarship over the last four decades has focused on First Nations governments regaining stewardship of protected areas and other traditional territories. With his intellectual perspectives forged in the University of California Berkeley's College of Environmental Design, where he received his doctorate from the Department of Landscape Architecture, he began research on conflicts around public sex in urban parks in the 1980s and in 1997 co-edited one of the first surveys of LGBT activism in public space, Queers in Space: Communities | Public Space | Sites of Resistance - an anthology that won a Lambda literary award. More recently, he has been exploring a broader concept of 'queer infrastructure' that combines critical understandings of space with those of formation of LGBT organizations and metropolitan political economies. After teaching in North America and Europe, most recently as an Associate Dean at George Mason University in northern Virginia, Brent is based at KEXMIN field station, a research group back where he grew up on the drier islands between Vancouver, Seattle, and Victoria.

Dr. Erika Svendsen  is a social scientist with the U.S. Forest Service. Erika is a leader in the field of environmental stewardship specifically as it relates to civic engagement and governance. She is the co-Director of the  NYC Urban Field Station , a special partnership between the U.S. Forest Service, NYC Parks and the Natural Areas Conservancy. The goal of the field station is to work at the intersection of research and practice to improve conditions between humans and the environment. The field station is part of a growing network to advance research, cultivate ideas, and foster collaboration among scientists and practitioners focused on urban forestry as they relate to today’s most pressing issues. Erika is co-author of the book,  How Planting Trees Strengthens the Roots of Democracy  and soon to be released co-edited volume,  Green Readiness, Response and Recovery.  She has received the U.S Forest Service Chief's Award for engaging urban America and the agency’s Early Career Scientist Award for the development of  STEW-MAP , a sustainability tool to assess, visualize and support the work of thousands of civic groups in caring for their local environment. Prior to joining the U.S. Forest Service, Erika was the Executive Director of NYC Parks’ GreenThumb and the Fellowship Director for LEAD International. She received her doctorate in Urban Planning from Columbia University, a M.S. from Yale FES, and a B.A. from Allegheny College.

Dr. Erika Svendsen is a social scientist with the U.S. Forest Service. Erika is a leader in the field of environmental stewardship specifically as it relates to civic engagement and governance. She is the co-Director of the NYC Urban Field Station, a special partnership between the U.S. Forest Service, NYC Parks and the Natural Areas Conservancy. The goal of the field station is to work at the intersection of research and practice to improve conditions between humans and the environment. The field station is part of a growing network to advance research, cultivate ideas, and foster collaboration among scientists and practitioners focused on urban forestry as they relate to today’s most pressing issues. Erika is co-author of the book, How Planting Trees Strengthens the Roots of Democracy and soon to be released co-edited volume, Green Readiness, Response and Recovery. She has received the U.S Forest Service Chief's Award for engaging urban America and the agency’s Early Career Scientist Award for the development of STEW-MAP, a sustainability tool to assess, visualize and support the work of thousands of civic groups in caring for their local environment. Prior to joining the U.S. Forest Service, Erika was the Executive Director of NYC Parks’ GreenThumb and the Fellowship Director for LEAD International. She received her doctorate in Urban Planning from Columbia University, a M.S. from Yale FES, and a B.A. from Allegheny College.

Helen Forgione  is the Senior Ecologist at the Natural Areas Conservancy, a nonprofit organization that restores and conserves the green and blue spaces of New York City in order to enhance the lives of all New Yorkers. Helen established NAC’s citywide assessment of NYC’s natural areas including 10,000 acres of municipal forests, grasslands and wetlands. She is currently focusing on a program of leveraging forest management within NYC by aligning restoration among other non-profits with the recent  Forest Management Framework for New York City   http://naturalareasnyc.org/content/forests/fmf-f6-hires-singles-reduced.pdf  . Helen has held previous positions at the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and NYC Department of Parks and Recreation and has over 25 years of experience working in ecology in the NYC metropolitan region. Helen holds a MS in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Rutgers University and a BS in Biology from the University of Connecticut.

Helen Forgione is the Senior Ecologist at the Natural Areas Conservancy, a nonprofit organization that restores and conserves the green and blue spaces of New York City in order to enhance the lives of all New Yorkers. Helen established NAC’s citywide assessment of NYC’s natural areas including 10,000 acres of municipal forests, grasslands and wetlands. She is currently focusing on a program of leveraging forest management within NYC by aligning restoration among other non-profits with the recent Forest Management Framework for New York City http://naturalareasnyc.org/content/forests/fmf-f6-hires-singles-reduced.pdf . Helen has held previous positions at the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and NYC Department of Parks and Recreation and has over 25 years of experience working in ecology in the NYC metropolitan region. Helen holds a MS in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Rutgers University and a BS in Biology from the University of Connecticut.

Diana Gruberg  is the Horticultural Manager at Gowanus Canal Conservancy where she engages the community in creating a dynamic public realm and oversees site maintenance, planting, and nursery operations. Diana has 10 years of experience in horticulture, education, and design. As a designer at Interface Studio and Future Green Studio she gained experience in all phases of landscape design, master planning and public outreach on projects at a range of scales, from neighborhood plans to public plazas to residential design-build projects. With a background as a public park gardener and environmental educator, she approaches stewardship and design as hands-on community efforts. Diana holds a Master of Landscape Architecture from University of Pennsylvania and a BA in Political Science from Barnard College.

Diana Gruberg is the Horticultural Manager at Gowanus Canal Conservancy where she engages the community in creating a dynamic public realm and oversees site maintenance, planting, and nursery operations. Diana has 10 years of experience in horticulture, education, and design. As a designer at Interface Studio and Future Green Studio she gained experience in all phases of landscape design, master planning and public outreach on projects at a range of scales, from neighborhood plans to public plazas to residential design-build projects. With a background as a public park gardener and environmental educator, she approaches stewardship and design as hands-on community efforts. Diana holds a Master of Landscape Architecture from University of Pennsylvania and a BA in Political Science from Barnard College.

Leila Mougoui Bakhtiari  is an urban ecologist currently working with the Natural Areas Conservancy in New York City. She received a B.S. in Environmental Studies with a concentration on urban ecosystems from The New School. Her work focuses on urban forest health studies, restoration and conservation efforts in NYC natural areas. She is also the co-chair of the urban forestry committee with Gowanus Canal Conservancy. A true forest analyst by nature, Leila’s favorite outdoor activity is to count trees.

Leila Mougoui Bakhtiari is an urban ecologist currently working with the Natural Areas Conservancy in New York City. She received a B.S. in Environmental Studies with a concentration on urban ecosystems from The New School. Her work focuses on urban forest health studies, restoration and conservation efforts in NYC natural areas. She is also the co-chair of the urban forestry committee with Gowanus Canal Conservancy. A true forest analyst by nature, Leila’s favorite outdoor activity is to count trees.

Toni L. Griffin  is the founder of Urban Planning for the American City, based in New York, specializing in leading complex, trans-disciplinary planning and urban design projects for multi-sector clients in cities with long histories of spatial and social injustice. Recent and current clients include the cities of Detroit, Memphis, Milwaukee, Pittsburgh and St. Louis. Toni is also Professor in Practice of Urban Planning at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and leads The Just City Lab, a research platform for developing values-based planning methodologies and tools, including the Just City Index and a framework of indicators and metrics for evaluating public life and urban justice in public plazas. Ms. Griffin received a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Notre Dame and a Loeb Fellowship from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. In 2014, Toni was the Visiting Associate Professor and Theodore B. and Doris Shoong Lee Chair in Real Estate Law and Urban Planning, in the Department of City and Regional Planning at University of California, Berkeley.

Toni L. Griffin is the founder of Urban Planning for the American City, based in New York, specializing in leading complex, trans-disciplinary planning and urban design projects for multi-sector clients in cities with long histories of spatial and social injustice. Recent and current clients include the cities of Detroit, Memphis, Milwaukee, Pittsburgh and St. Louis. Toni is also Professor in Practice of Urban Planning at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and leads The Just City Lab, a research platform for developing values-based planning methodologies and tools, including the Just City Index and a framework of indicators and metrics for evaluating public life and urban justice in public plazas. Ms. Griffin received a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Notre Dame and a Loeb Fellowship from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. In 2014, Toni was the Visiting Associate Professor and Theodore B. and Doris Shoong Lee Chair in Real Estate Law and Urban Planning, in the Department of City and Regional Planning at University of California, Berkeley.

Lindsay K. Campbell  is a research social scientist with the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station - NYC Urban Field Station. Her research explores the dynamics of urban politics, natural resource stewardship, and sustainability policymaking. She is joint PI of STEW-MAP, which maps the social networks and spatial turf of environmental stewardship groups. She is the author of  City of Forests, City of Farms: Sustainability Planning for New York City’s Nature  (Cornell University Press, 2017). Dr. Campbell holds a BA in Public Policy from Princeton University, a Masters in City Planning from MIT, and a PhD in Geography from Rutgers University.

Lindsay K. Campbell is a research social scientist with the USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station - NYC Urban Field Station. Her research explores the dynamics of urban politics, natural resource stewardship, and sustainability policymaking. She is joint PI of STEW-MAP, which maps the social networks and spatial turf of environmental stewardship groups. She is the author of City of Forests, City of Farms: Sustainability Planning for New York City’s Nature (Cornell University Press, 2017). Dr. Campbell holds a BA in Public Policy from Princeton University, a Masters in City Planning from MIT, and a PhD in Geography from Rutgers University.

Shawn L. Rickenbacker  is the director at the J. Max Bond Center, The City College of New York’s research and design center focused on advancing broad solutions that empower people and the built environment to equitably provide the opportunities and living conditions necessary to ensure successful urban futures for all people. Born and raised in New York City, Rickenbacker is a trained architect, urbanist and systems technologist whose work has focused on the convergence of physical space and digital systems within the built environment, how we can learn from it and its relationship to the human experience. He is the co-founder of the privately held research and design consultancy, Urban Data + Design. Rickenbacker received his Master of Architecture from The University of Virginia, with a Certificate in American Urbanism. He earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Syracuse University and a Certificate in Advanced Digital Interaction Design, from New York University, Center of Advanced Digital Applications.

Shawn L. Rickenbacker is the director at the J. Max Bond Center, The City College of New York’s research and design center focused on advancing broad solutions that empower people and the built environment to equitably provide the opportunities and living conditions necessary to ensure successful urban futures for all people. Born and raised in New York City, Rickenbacker is a trained architect, urbanist and systems technologist whose work has focused on the convergence of physical space and digital systems within the built environment, how we can learn from it and its relationship to the human experience. He is the co-founder of the privately held research and design consultancy, Urban Data + Design. Rickenbacker received his Master of Architecture from The University of Virginia, with a Certificate in American Urbanism. He earned a Bachelor of Architecture degree from Syracuse University and a Certificate in Advanced Digital Interaction Design, from New York University, Center of Advanced Digital Applications.

Amy Seek  is the Design Director within Stantec’s New York City landscape studio. She establishes the landscape vision for multi-disciplinary projects from waterfronts to urban parks within the city and across the US. A landscape architect with over a decade of experience working primarily in the public realm, she is passionate about the contribution public space can make to urban quality of life, city identity, urban habitat, and resilience. Prior to joining Stantec, she served as co-Director of Wayward London, as a project manager at Verdant Gardens, a design-build studio in New York City, and as a designer at Hargreaves Associates in New York City and San Francisco, where her projects included the Google Headquarters in Mountain View, Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, and Los Angeles State Historic Park. While at Hargreaves, Amy collaborated with environmental justice organization ArcEcology on an initiative that won the Award of Excellence in Analysis and Planning from the ASLA in 2007. Amy maintains an interest in food policy and urban nutrition as they bear on community resilience and sustainability. She is a published author and a runner.

Amy Seek is the Design Director within Stantec’s New York City landscape studio. She establishes the landscape vision for multi-disciplinary projects from waterfronts to urban parks within the city and across the US. A landscape architect with over a decade of experience working primarily in the public realm, she is passionate about the contribution public space can make to urban quality of life, city identity, urban habitat, and resilience. Prior to joining Stantec, she served as co-Director of Wayward London, as a project manager at Verdant Gardens, a design-build studio in New York City, and as a designer at Hargreaves Associates in New York City and San Francisco, where her projects included the Google Headquarters in Mountain View, Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, and Los Angeles State Historic Park. While at Hargreaves, Amy collaborated with environmental justice organization ArcEcology on an initiative that won the Award of Excellence in Analysis and Planning from the ASLA in 2007. Amy maintains an interest in food policy and urban nutrition as they bear on community resilience and sustainability. She is a published author and a runner.

Dr. Marcha Johnson, ASLA  is a landscape architect with NYC Parks, specializing in design of ecologically rich waterfront parks. She has been an adjunct professor at City College of NY for 26 years, teaching regional ecology, plant identification, planting design and sustainable soil and water in the School of Architecture and discussing the spontaneous development, and benefits of, volunteer plant communities. Her career focus is the design of post-industrial waterfronts which are integrated with their ecological context. Marcha’s current collaborative work at Randall’s Island demonstrates phytoremediation techniques to address contaminant in historic urban fill along a collapsing stone sea wall, and a habitat-rich shoreline which accommodates changing water levels. Award-winning work at Harlem R. Park resulted in a prototypical porous seawall, blending ecology, community involvement, access and environmental education.  With CCNY Alum Amanda Bayley, Dr. Johnson recently co-edited  Coastal Change, Ocean Conservation and Resilient Communities , a collection of essays and design case studies that explores a range of ideas and best practices for adapting to dynamic waterfront conditions while incorporating nature conservation in urbanized coastal areas.

Dr. Marcha Johnson, ASLA is a landscape architect with NYC Parks, specializing in design of ecologically rich waterfront parks. She has been an adjunct professor at City College of NY for 26 years, teaching regional ecology, plant identification, planting design and sustainable soil and water in the School of Architecture and discussing the spontaneous development, and benefits of, volunteer plant communities. Her career focus is the design of post-industrial waterfronts which are integrated with their ecological context. Marcha’s current collaborative work at Randall’s Island demonstrates phytoremediation techniques to address contaminant in historic urban fill along a collapsing stone sea wall, and a habitat-rich shoreline which accommodates changing water levels. Award-winning work at Harlem R. Park resulted in a prototypical porous seawall, blending ecology, community involvement, access and environmental education.

With CCNY Alum Amanda Bayley, Dr. Johnson recently co-edited Coastal Change, Ocean Conservation and Resilient Communities, a collection of essays and design case studies that explores a range of ideas and best practices for adapting to dynamic waterfront conditions while incorporating nature conservation in urbanized coastal areas.

Andrew Lavallee, FASLA, RLA,  has 30 years of experience designing and management of technically challenging, multidisciplinary projects. His practice currently focuses on technical consulting, cost planning, and O+M strategies for public realm projects throughout the United Sates. Andrew is the co-author of the High Performance Landscape Guidelines: Parks for the 21st Century and numerous articles on technical subjects ranging from construction detailing to the development of economically sustainable parks. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Landscape Architecture Graduate Program at City College of New York

Andrew Lavallee, FASLA, RLA, has 30 years of experience designing and management of technically challenging, multidisciplinary projects. His practice currently focuses on technical consulting, cost planning, and O+M strategies for public realm projects throughout the United Sates. Andrew is the co-author of the High Performance Landscape Guidelines: Parks for the 21st Century and numerous articles on technical subjects ranging from construction detailing to the development of economically sustainable parks. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Landscape Architecture Graduate Program at City College of New York

Jaffer Kolb  co-directs the New York-based design practice New Affiliates, an award-winning practice whose work has been published internationally and includes a range of scales from exhibition design to ground up buildings and mid-size reuse projects. Recently he guest-edited a special section of Log 41 called "Working Queer," and writes on the intersection of architectural form with the politics of objects, on design methodologies, and sometimes on nature. He was the 2015 Muschenheim teaching fellow at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor, and has since taught at schools around New York. He received his Master of Architecture from Princeton University's School of Architecture, his Master of Urban Planning from the London School of Economics, and his Bachelor of Arts from Wesleyan University.

Jaffer Kolb co-directs the New York-based design practice New Affiliates, an award-winning practice whose work has been published internationally and includes a range of scales from exhibition design to ground up buildings and mid-size reuse projects. Recently he guest-edited a special section of Log 41 called "Working Queer," and writes on the intersection of architectural form with the politics of objects, on design methodologies, and sometimes on nature. He was the 2015 Muschenheim teaching fellow at the University of Michigan Ann Arbor, and has since taught at schools around New York. He received his Master of Architecture from Princeton University's School of Architecture, his Master of Urban Planning from the London School of Economics, and his Bachelor of Arts from Wesleyan University.

Mary Alice Lee  is the Director of the NYC Playgrounds Program with The Trust for Public Land (TPL). As director, Mary is currently overseeing a public-private partnership with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), NYC Department of Education (DOE) and School Construction Authority (SCA) to design and build up to 40 new school playgrounds around NYC that will capture at least an inch of rain through green infrastructure. Most recently, Mary Alice was responsible for a public-private partnership with the NYC DOE, NYC SCA and NYC Parks and Recreation that designed 185 school playgrounds through a community participatory process, as part of Mayor Bloomberg’s PLANYC 2030 Schoolyards to Playgrounds Initiative. The playgrounds include sports fields, basketball courts, fitness equipment, play equipment, drinking fountains, benches, game tables, gazebos, trees and gardens. After opening, each site receives stewardship support from TPL through grants and workshops to encourage community use. She opened her 200th playground in October 2018. Mary Alice received an Honorary Membership in the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) in 2014. She also received the ASLA NY chapter President’s Award for Inspiring the Next Generation in 2016.

Mary Alice Lee is the Director of the NYC Playgrounds Program with The Trust for Public Land (TPL). As director, Mary is currently overseeing a public-private partnership with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), NYC Department of Education (DOE) and School Construction Authority (SCA) to design and build up to 40 new school playgrounds around NYC that will capture at least an inch of rain through green infrastructure. Most recently, Mary Alice was responsible for a public-private partnership with the NYC DOE, NYC SCA and NYC Parks and Recreation that designed 185 school playgrounds through a community participatory process, as part of Mayor Bloomberg’s PLANYC 2030 Schoolyards to Playgrounds Initiative. The playgrounds include sports fields, basketball courts, fitness equipment, play equipment, drinking fountains, benches, game tables, gazebos, trees and gardens. After opening, each site receives stewardship support from TPL through grants and workshops to encourage community use. She opened her 200th playground in October 2018. Mary Alice received an Honorary Membership in the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) in 2014. She also received the ASLA NY chapter President’s Award for Inspiring the Next Generation in 2016.

Andrea Parker  has a passion for regenerating urban green infrastructure through civic engagement. As the Executive Director of the Gowanus Canal Conservancy, she works to empower a community of environmental stewards and design advocates in the rapidly changing Gowanus Watershed. As an instructor at City College of New York, she engages landscape architecture students with the complex ecological, economic and cultural forces at play in NYC’s dynamic urban ecology. In her previous work as a Landscape Designer, she focused on urban and community resilience after Superstorm Sandy, as well as gained experience in public garden master-planning and residential design and construction administration. Her prior background as a gardener and nursery propagator enriches her design and advocacy work with a pragmatic understanding of how landscapes are built and maintained. She received a BA from the University of Chicago, studied Landscape Horticulture at Merritt College, and received a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the University of Virginia.

Andrea Parker has a passion for regenerating urban green infrastructure through civic engagement. As the Executive Director of the Gowanus Canal Conservancy, she works to empower a community of environmental stewards and design advocates in the rapidly changing Gowanus Watershed. As an instructor at City College of New York, she engages landscape architecture students with the complex ecological, economic and cultural forces at play in NYC’s dynamic urban ecology. In her previous work as a Landscape Designer, she focused on urban and community resilience after Superstorm Sandy, as well as gained experience in public garden master-planning and residential design and construction administration. Her prior background as a gardener and nursery propagator enriches her design and advocacy work with a pragmatic understanding of how landscapes are built and maintained. She received a BA from the University of Chicago, studied Landscape Horticulture at Merritt College, and received a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the University of Virginia.

darren patrick/dp  is a scholar and an activist currently based at York University in Toronto, Ontario. They trouble and dance at the crossroads of queerness, transfeminism, urban ecologies, poetry, and autonomous politics. Their previous work has focused, among other things, on the socio-environmental histories of the High Line and the Hudson River Park, from which they have articulated the contours of a queer urban ecology. More recently, as a member of the Bologna, Italy-based collective Laboratorio Smaschieramenti, they have worked collaboratively to create archives of transfeministqueer social movements and to translate the praxes of transfeministqueer autonomy for anglophone audiences. Their writing has appeared in numerous edited collections, academic journals, and wide-circulation periodicals such as  The Guardian ,  Internazionale ,  Canadian Art , and  The Avery Review.

darren patrick/dp is a scholar and an activist currently based at York University in Toronto, Ontario. They trouble and dance at the crossroads of queerness, transfeminism, urban ecologies, poetry, and autonomous politics. Their previous work has focused, among other things, on the socio-environmental histories of the High Line and the Hudson River Park, from which they have articulated the contours of a queer urban ecology. More recently, as a member of the Bologna, Italy-based collective Laboratorio Smaschieramenti, they have worked collaboratively to create archives of transfeministqueer social movements and to translate the praxes of transfeministqueer autonomy for anglophone audiences. Their writing has appeared in numerous edited collections, academic journals, and wide-circulation periodicals such as The Guardian, Internazionale, Canadian Art, and The Avery Review.

urban forest design and media lab

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Exhibition

An immersive video exhibition that speaks to novel ecosystems, environmental justice, resiliency, water management, toxicity. 

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Tech Fair

Exhibition of student designed and executed technologies, which seek to support iterative and collaborative urban forestry design and planning processes, featuring:

  • Collaborative urban forestry mapping centered around a light table

  • Infrared camera demonstration and new methods for analyzing vegetative health density using LiDar

  • Virtual reality site analysis

Past Programming

2018 Rising Urbanists: Green Infrastructure for Coastal Resilience

The CCNY ASLA Student Chapter invites students and professionals from Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Engineering, Urban Design,Urban Planning, Sustainability, Development, Real Estate and Community Boards to Rising Urbanists – a day-long conference to imagine the potential for green infrastructure to address socio-economic disparities in sea level rise and storm preparedness in New York City. This day-long conference will feature 2 moderated panels, 8 breakout sessions, a community art show, technology fair and site tours of affected communities.

Panels and breakout sessions feature 22 speakers including:  Ashley Dawson, Catherine Seavitt Nordenson and Brad McKee.

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2017 Rising Urbanists: Green Infrastructure for the 22nd Century

Organized by the ASLA-NY Student Chapter at the City College of New York this multi-disciplinary conference offered an opportunity to imagine the potential for green infrastructure to act as a catalyst in driving urban design into the 22nd century. The Rising Urbanists Conference was geared toward students and professionals in architecture, landscape architecture, engineering, urban design, urban planning, real estate, and sustainability throughout the tri-state area. We are hosted this event to foster lasting relationships between emerging professionals in allied fields. It featured two interdisciplinary moderated panels and a very successful design charrette lead by the Gowanus Canal Conservancy.